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Boone County

Marshall Newhouse

Marshall Newhouse farms with his wife and daughter’s family. They grow corn, soybeans, wheat and hay, and raise pastured turkeys for the Thanksgiving market. They have just started organic production on a 72-acre field.

7/13/2018

Last week was warm and dry. With temps around 90 most days, wheat and oat fields have been steadily disappearing. We are at a point where a shower would be welcome on pollinating corn and flowering soybean fields. Everything is getting to the point where it has that look of being a little thirsty. As I look over my bean fields, I only have one with a waterhemp outbreak. Way too much water moving across that field a month ago must have diluted what should have been the right program for that pesky weed. It seems there’s always one field to have to clean up. Other than that, this season is moving along very quickly.

7/13/2018

Last week was warm and dry. With temps around 90 most days, wheat and oat fields have been steadily disappearing. We are at a point where a shower would be welcome on pollinating corn and flowering soybean fields. Everything is getting to the point where it has that look of being a little thirsty. As I look over my bean fields, I only have one with a waterhemp outbreak. Way too much water moving across that field a month ago must have diluted what should have been the right program for that pesky weed. It seems there’s always one field to have to clean up. Other than that, this season is moving along very quickly.

7/6/2018

Last week saw multiple days in the 90s and a half-inch of rain. The last storm came in a squall line and flattened most of the county's oats and about 10 percent of the wheat. My cornfields are showing the first tassels. This is the earliest in my 39 years of farming. Most of the beans are flowering, and someone will be opening up a wheat field within the next 10 days. Japanese beetles are beginning their work in my wife’s garden with no pressure out in the fields yet. Scouting will be a priority in the coming weeks.

6/29/2018

After dumping another 2.2 inches out of the gauge Tuesday evening, we are at the point where the corn is ready for summer heat and a reprieve from the rains. My guess is we will be seeing the first tassels within two weeks. Phytophthora is beginning to show. After three weeks of excessive rains, we have been the perfect petri dish for whatever might come our way in the bean fields.