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Lee County

Larry Hummel

Larry Hummel of Dixon has been farming with his brother since 1975 in the corner of Lee, Ogle, and Whiteside counties. They raise corn, soybeans, and a little wheat.

8/24/2018

Things are changing fast here in Lee county. A few fields of corn have reached maturity and are in the process of drying down. A lot of fields have some level of gray leaf spot, and I'm seeing some Goss's wilt scattered around the countryside. Other than that, the corn looks good around here. About the only thing holding back yields are the wet spots from all the rain in May and June. Soybeans look exceptional. Of course, they had problems with too much moisture this spring, but I think they might outshine the corn. SDS is popping up in some fields, but a lot of fields are starting to turn, so I don't think it will be a huge problem. Harvest is just around the corner, so you better be ready.

8/17/2018

No report

8/10/2018

We got a nice rain this week that delivered anywhere from a half-inch to an inch and a half, just what we needed as the crops head towards the finish line. The Lee County Farm Bureau Foundation's 25th anniversary/fundraiser is Thursday. In the last 25 years, the foundation has awarded 73 scholarships to students pursuing degrees in ag-related fields of study, reached out to thousands of elementary students through Ag in the Classroom, and has given away hundreds of ag-related books to schools and libraries with the Books by the Bushel program. Tickets are still available at $100 each including dinner for two at the Post House and a drawing for more than $8,000 in cash prizes. Call 815-857-3531.

8/3/2018

I have been looking for the elusive five-bean pod. Although I haven't found one yet, there seems to be more four-bean pods than normal and not that many two-bean pods. Except for areas that were too wet or drowned out early this summer, there are some good looking soybeans out there. The big question is can they make up for the stunted beans that had wet feet for the first half of the season. After all the rain we had earlier, it’s hard to believe crops are getting close to needing a good shot of rain.